It Won’t Be News ’Til Someone Explodes – Herald Tribune

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With polls showing a razor-thin margin separating Hillary and Bernie less than a week before primary voting in California, the unruffled John Podesta was at it again, making the case for transparency with government UFO records and oblivious to any potential political blowback. Relaxed and conversational, conceding how UFO chatter traditionally “is not a career enhancer,” HRC’s campaign director didn’t shrink from the controversy during a Code Conference forum in Rancho Palos Verdes.

Now if only the panelists knew where to go with it …

Podesta was recalling how, shortly after leaving the Clinton White House, he had assisted UFOs: Generals, Pilots and Government Officials Go On the Record author Leslie Kean in her hunt for recovery/analysis reports on the 1965 Kecksburg crash. Before he could finish, Silicon Valley tech columnist Kara Swisher couldn’t contain herself, dispensed with the foreplay, and blurted it out: “Is this an alien?”

Just moments before the "accident," he was overheard muttering obscenities about how the CIRVIS material in JANAP 146 had been transferred to AFM 10-206 before it became AFI 10-206 but there were no additional details about OPREP-3 after their originating platform at DoD 5040.6-M-1 was upgraded to DoD 5040.6-M-2 ... /CREDIT: elixirofknowledge.com Just moments before the “accident,” he was overheard muttering obscenities about how the CIRVIS material in JANAP 146 had been transferred to AFM 10-206 before it became AFI 10-206 but there were no additional details about OPREP-3 after their originating platform at DoD 5040.6-M-1 was upgraded to DoD 5040.6-M-2 … /CREDIT: elixirofknowledge.com

Jeez, lady, really? Already? We barely know each other …

But Podesta didn’t even blink. “Well, nobody knew what it was,” Podesta replied. “All of a sudden, when the FOIA case was filed, it turned out most of the files had disappeared. It was clear there was an investigation by the Air Force.”

“That seems convenient,” interjected political pundit Ezra Klein.

“That seemed convenient,” Podesta concurred with a smile. And then he sent out another signal, about how “I meet a lot of politicians, people in Washington, and others who say ‘I’m with you, but I can’t say so,’ right?”

Psst, Ezra: That’s your cue to ask who these closet cheerleaders are, exactly how many is ‘a lot,’ their names, or at least their positions, how far up the chain they go, how widespread is the sentiment, military sources too? etc. etc.  

Nothing? Nada? Don’t do scoops anymore?

Ah well, Podesta’s remarks about the futile search for UFO records went to the real heart of the gridlock. Truth is, you can’t really blame Swisher or Klein or anyone else for avoiding specifics, because deciphering the mindset responsible for all those missing documents might be more difficult than answering the Is this an alien? question. Push it too hard and, who knows, we could be talking spontaneous human combustion. Seriously. I’m serious.

Unrelenting FOIA-slinging Paul Dean is the latest poor soul to attempt the hopeless pursuit of untangling the gnarly tumor of bureaucratic opacity – metastasizing since World War II – created by the arbitrary military rules and regs blocking access to UFO data. At his UFOs – Documenting The Evidence blog, the Australian researcher has been posting the sort of dense documentation that will no doubt scare off virtually every corporate journalist and editor in the U.S. And that’s why, considering the time and resources it would take for policy-makers as well as journalists to catch up with guys like Paul Dean, longtime American investigators are pessimistic about Podesta/Clinton’s well-publicized aspirations for ending UFO secrecy. Consider this riff on just one of Dean’s many threads:

The Communications Instructions for Vital Intelligence Sightings (CIRVIS) – the military guidelines for logging potential security threats, from missile launches to UFOS – was first published in 1954, as part of the Joint Army Navy Air Force Protocol manual, or JANAP 146. Although the Air Force announced it was getting out of the UFO business in 1970 after determining The Great Taboo embodied neither superior technology nor a national security threat, JANAP 146 tacitly acknowledged the recklessness of that public gesture by keeping UFOs on its mandatory monitoring list of usual suspects. Then, in 1996, JANAP 146 morphed into Air Force Manual 10-206, or AFM 10-206 — and its CIRVIS instructions continued to itemize UFOs as a separate category of interest. In 2008, AFM 10-206 evolved into Air Force Instruction 10-206, or AFI 10-206. Curiously, three years later, just as they were being pressed for details by Lee Speigel at Huffington Post, authorities revised the manual again and dropped the UFO reference altogether. No reason given, they just did it.

What made AFI 10-206 so noteworthy was its reference to OPREP, or Operational Reporting. This system was prioritized into numbered categories, with the bell-clanging number 3 “used by military units at any level of command to report significant events and incidents to the highest levels of command,” according to the language. Dean found UFO-related OPREP-3 links in now declassified telexes from the 1970s, most notably associated with the autumn 1975 UFO wave in which air space above military installations near the Canadian border was repeatedly challenged by elusive intruders euphemistically referred to as “helicopters.”

Equally intriguing was a document from 2002, called Defense Department’s Decision Logic Table Instructions for Recording and Handling Visual Information Material, aka DoD 5040.6-M-1. This one instructed military personnel on how to file “imagery that records UFOs and other aerial phenomena not obviously identifiable as conventional aircraft or missiles.” Gun-cam pix? Oh yeah, don’t throw those away. But that wasn’t news to John Greenewald, whose Black Vault website has been posting declassified government documents for 20 years. Greenewald actually used DoD 5040.6-M-1 as an exhibit in his lectures until, by 2005, it was swapped out for DoD 5040.6-M-2 which, again for reasons unknown, eliminated the UFO section altogether. Go figure.

For Barry Greenwood, who’s been on this thankless trail for some 50 years, Dean’s blogging tenacity is impressive. “Paul is doing a good job. He’s very careful, and his writing about the past is very encouraging. And I find the OPREP-3 material fascinating.”

Co-author of the seminal Clear Intent, which in 1984 detailed the ongoing cover-up from reams of UFO records unclogged by FOIA, Greenwood holds out little hope for a Podesta/Clinton-style openness. For one thing, the declassified material from the early 1950s and ‘60s – vital to understanding how today’s policies were shaped – is voluminous, decentralized, and cost-prohibitive when it comes to digitalization. These are the records we do know about, and they’ve been collecting dust in the public arena for decades. For another, Greenwood says neither he nor his networking colleagues who’ve been immersed in reassembling the fragmented historical context of The Great Taboo have been approached by Podesta.

“He keeps talking about wanting to open the books on UFOs, but we’re not sure where he’s getting his information from or which records he’s talking about,” Greenwood says. “If he’s advising Hillary Clinton on this, he needs to get information that isn’t tainted, that’s historically accurate. If she gets bad information and starts using it, the Trump campaign is going to absolutely annihilate her.”

De Void can’t wait for Trump to start talking UFOs.

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