Can You Pass The World’s Shortest IQ Test? Even Harvard Students Struggle Doing So

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    There are many methods used to determine someone’s intelligence. We typically use IQ tests as they are the most accurate measurement of intelligence we have today.

    There is a lot of reasons why one might want to measure their intelligence! The IQ test has been used for decades now, and there are even multiple different versions it can be texted. However, not everyone might have the time to go take an extensive intelligence test! But you have to be able to fit the Cognitive Reflection Test (CRT)!

    The Cognitive Reflection Test has been named the shortest IQ intelligence test to ever exist! It was developed in Princeton back in 2005 by psychologist named Shane Frederick. He designed the cognitive reflection test to test your ability to ignore your gut response and think slower, yet more rationally. We all know that standardized testing methods are a failed method of estimating one’s intelligence, and that’s the whole basis for the Cognitive Reflection Test!

    Psychologically speaking, the cognitive reflection test is designed to test your ability to ignore the gut response. It is designed to test your intuitive thinking in favor is your analytical thinking. You must spend time reflecting on the answer you chose, and decipher what led you be wrong. Students from some of the most prestigious schools like Yale and Harvard even struggle to get all three answers correctly! Think you’re a natural born genius? Here’s your chance to prove it!

    Spend as much time as you please figuring out your answers. Intelligence is never estimated by how long it takes you to gather your answers, but only by the accuracy of the ones you provide. Ready? When you get all your answers, scroll down to the bottom for the answers!

    1. A bat and a ball cost $1.10 in total. The bat costs $1 more than the ball. How much does the ball cost?

    2. If it takes 5 machines 5 minutes to make 5 widgets, how long would it take 100 machines to make 100 widgets?

    3. In a lake, there is a patch of lily pads. Every day, the patch doubles in size. If it takes 48 days for the patch to cover the entire lake, how long would it take for the patch to cover half of the lake?

    The Answers

    1. 5 cents – There’s a very good chance you guessed 10 cents. The answer is actually a little less – a 5 cent ball plus a bat costing $1.05 will set you back $1.10. And, of course, $1.05 is exactly $1 more expensive than 5 cents. (A Princeton study found that people who responded 10 cents were “significantly” less patient than those who got the right answer.)

    2.  5 minutes – Your gut instinct might be to say 100 minutes. Fortunately, it wouldn’t take quite so long. From the question, we can determine it takes exactly 5 minutes for 1 widget machine to make 1 widget. Therefore, it would take 5 minutes to make 100 widgets from 100 widget machines.

    3.  47 days – You might have guessed 24 days. It seems intuitive to half the number of days because you’re halving the size of the lily pad patch. But if the area of the lake covered in lily pads doubles every day, it would only take one day for it to go from being half covered to fully covered. Take one day away from 48 days and you’re left with 47.

    This article was inspired by an article written by IFL Science.

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